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Legal Research Courses and Workshops

2017–2018 Legal Research Courses

We will be offering the following for-credit upper division legal research courses during the 2017–2018 term. Contact the librarian professor if you have any questions, and be sure to register for the course via the usual means.

Fall '17

Legal Research: Animal Law (593 A)
Professor: Tami Gierloff
​Fall '17
Fridays, 10:00–11:55 a.m.
1 Credit
7 week course; last class is October 6
Meets the Highly Specialized requirement

Description: This course provides strategies for conducting legal research with an emphasis on Animal Law resources. Designed to prepare law students for research in practice, clerkships and law school, this course will build upon the research skills students have previously acquired. In addition to federal and state legal resources, the course will introduce students to alternative research tools focusing on local and international materials as well as strategies for successful interdisciplinary research. The course will explore the different approaches needed for policy and planning research versus transactional and litigation-related research. Students learn through a combination of lectures, homework assignments, in-class exercises and other activities. Evaluation will be through two short research memos and one longer final research memo/project. This is a one-credit class meeting for seven weeks.

Legal Research: Administrative Law (592 A)
Professors: Mari Cheney, Jorge Juarez
Fall '17
Tuesdays, 8:30–10:25 a.m.
1 Credit
7 week course; last class is October 12
Meets the Highly Specialized requirement

Description: This course examines federal, state, and local sources of administrative law and teaches students how to research agency regulations, agency cases, and other sources of administrative law using a variety of free and commercial print and online sources. The goal of the course is to give students an understanding of the advanced research skills necessary for finding administrative authority in its various forms, including: enabling statutes, proposed and final agency regulations, decisions, opinions and policy, and executive orders. While the primary focus of this course will be on researching federal administrative law, one class session will be devoted to researching state and local administrative law.

Students will be evaluated based on class participation and on a final project focused on a regulatory issue and agency of their choosing.

Spring '18

Advanced Legal Research (598 A)
​Professor: Jorge Juarez
Spring '18
Wednesdays, 1:20–2:45 p.m.
Limit: 25 students
2 Credits
13 week course
Meets the Foundational and Experiential requirements

Description: This course provides a practical approach to modern legal research. Designed to prepare law students for research in practice, clerkships and law school, this course will build upon the research skills students acquired in first-year Legal Research classes. Students learn through a combination of lectures, weekly homework assignments, frequent in-class exercises and other activities.

Legal Research: International and Foreign (597 A)
Professors: Wendy Hitchcock, Rob Truman
Spring, '18
Thursdays, 1:40–2:35pm
​Limit: 25 students
1 Credit
13 week course
Meets the Highly Specialized requirement

Description: This course explores strategies for conducting research in Foreign, Comparative and International Law, using both electronic and print resources. The course begins by examining the sources of international law, including treaties, cases from international courts and tribunals, documents from international organizations, and scholarly publications. We will also explore finding the law of foreign nations, gaining an understanding of civil legal systems, and learning "work-arounds" when the sources are not in English. Using a problem-based approach, the class will incorporate the following topics while reviewing the sources of international law: international environmental law, international litigation and dispute resolution, international trade and investment law, and international human rights. Grading will be based on weekly in-class or out-of-class exercises and a final assignment consisting of research problems. This class is a requirement for the international law certificate.

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